Liturgical Boutique

source: Orbis Catholicus Secundus
The Rad Trad Liturgical Boutique is now open for business. This page will be a "blow out" department for experienced liturgical shoppers or just window browsers to discuss whatever matters of liturgical minutiae to their hearts' desire. Folded chasubles? Cushion or bookstand for the Missal? Gothic or Latin vestments? Solita oscula? Too many litanies in Slavic liturgy? Latinizations? Have your fill below!—and be respectful....

38 comments:

  1. I have just discovered this Boutique, and as a true Fetishist, I would like to begin the war.

    My first doubt/question is Concelebration. Some months ago I bought the 1965 Ritus seruandus in concelebratione Missae. A thing I like of it is that it begins, and puts as a model, the Pontifical High Mass instead of spoken Low Mass. But then the problems begin; I'm focusing on just one. The total suppression of the prayers at the foot of the Altar (ocasional in 1965 OM) becomes here permanent for concelebrants.

    § 21 Cum ad Altare peruenerint, concelebrantes, facta debita reuerentia, bini et bini ad Altare ascendunt idque osculantur; deinde sedem sibi assignatam petunt.
    § 22 Episcopus celebrans principalis, facta Altari reuerentia, dicit submissa uoce cum suis Ministris preces ante gradus Altaris faciendas; Missa deinde procedit uti alias, ...

    This is clearly an anticipation of the total destruction of the first part of the fore-Mass in the Nouus Ordo. But my question is different: does anybody here know how were these rites performed in the traditional Roman concelebration (when it existed), and how did they survived in the consecration/ordination rites?

    I hope to have made an enough decent question - sorry if it is not so. Concelebration is a rite most often hated by traddies as a modern corruption, while it seems to me (at least when it is a pontifical Mass concelebrated by the Bishop and members of his presbyterium) a truly traditional way of celebrating the Liturgy in a most-solemn way on the most solemn feasts.

    Kyrie eleison

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    1. I wonder if there are relics of concelebration in the local rites like Sarum and Lyon as well as Papal Mass. In all of those rites the diocesan clergy vest as subdeacons, deacons, or priests according to rank (although bishops at Papal Mass wear a cope, suggesting non-celebration) and sit in choir while the diocesan ordinary presides at the throne. This is consistent with what one would expect in the traditional understanding of the episcopacy. The "throne" is actually a teaching chair and teaching, according to the old and new Roman formulas for episcopal consecration, is the essence of that place in Holy Orders.

      I cannot speak for Sarum, but at Papal Mass the cardinals are supposed to surround the altar, although they kneel for the consecration rather than participate in the anaphora. I think it quite significant that they do not sit in choir. It seems probable that they only took an active priestly role in the Mass of the Faithful.

      What could their role in the Mass of the Faithful look like? Hard to say and the historical evidence on how it was done is quite sparse. In the Byzantine rite only the bishop/main celebrant says the anaphora (however some Greek Catholics have curiously adopted the Roman practice in this regard). This may have been done in the first millennium when the anaphora was sung in the preface tone in the Roman rite, but that seems less likely when in the 8th/9th century the celebrants began to recite the anaphora in a quiet voice. What seems likely to me is what is done in the old rite of episcopal consecration: the main celebrant says the anaphora in a subdued voice audible to those at the altar, who say the anaphora with him. The main celebrant however administers Communion under both kinds to the concelebrants rather than allowing them to take the Sacred Species themselves. The old rite of priestly ordination always struck me as unusual in that the priests receive Communion in the manner of altar boys.

      As private Masses became more common in religious communities and cathedrals there was less reason to concelebrate given that someone would celebrate a conventual high Mass anyway. Ergo concelebration died, leaving behind traces of its forms and rituals in the local rites of Mass.

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  2. Congratulations, The Rad Trad, on the first day's trading in your new Liturgical Boutique (the MUST VISIT location for Clerical garb).

    A riveting first Post in the Boutique and I look forward to further pithy contributions.

    P.S. Spanish Birettas. Do you stock them ?

    in Domino

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    1. Ah, the 'bonete'! Spain has so much to offer a liturgical boutique: appareled vestments, the collarín, the Mozarabic rite.

      Other topics for consideration: the elevation or sanctus candle, the pax brede, the digitum, whether it is proper to distribute Holy Communion at a Requiem....

      Thank you, Rad Trad!

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    2. Don't forget tunicled acolytes.

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    3. If you like Spanish liturgical peculiarities, you surely like this forum (in Spanish):

      http://liturgia.mforos.com/

      May tunicled acolytes, mitred abbots, and of course our most venerable Hispanic Liturgy return some day!!!

      Kyrie eleison

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  3. Dearest Rad Trad,

    I have been recently asked to procure some vestments for a new Oratory for the Institute of Christ the King. They are quite intrigued by my liturgical t-t-tastes and have asked for my reassignment to aid them. Their current wardrobe is far too simplistic and most unacceptable. Based on my prior more than satisfactory business with you, I have a new order:

    32 (yes, 32) albs in this style with one modification: the lace MUST be pink. Size: Young, pretty, meaty boys.
    http://www.luzarvestments.co.uk/oldlitwear_pages/Lace%20Alb%204640f.jpg

    12 each of priest,deacon, and subdeacon full sets, Gold vestments done in this style and colors (most appropriate for any time of year, which makes it most convenient)
    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-I8H7PfIRpgQ/U83l1UKitdI/AAAAAAAAABo/2rGcLjOfE3g/s1600/Solemn_Page_28_0352.jpg

    If the Institute and I cannot have a church like the Brompton Oratory, then we shall outdo them in vestments at least.

    -Fr. Anthony Blanche, SJ

    PS: Could you also duplicate "Msgr." Gilles Wach's costume for me. I want him to think me a Monsignor when I meet him.

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  4. Since your boutique (I'm told) uses the motto "Ne plus ultra (not if we can help it!)" I'm wondering if you plan to carry the fascia con fiocchi, the fiocchi del saturno, and (to make it truly a head-to-toe outfitters) the buckle shoes? I'm not in the market right now, but I could be ....

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  5. Dear Sirs,

    I have been searching for a number of years, without success, for the rare work 'A Hundred and One Uses for a Lace Alb'. Do you perchance have a copy in your boutique?

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    1. My Dearest Rubricarius,

      No liturgical boutique would be complete without it. I find the work is quite excellent, but only scratches the surface of the uses for a lace alb. Most of the best ones are too naughty to be printed. YUM. YUM.

      Fr. Anthony Blanche, SJ

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    2. I suppose one could wash the car with a lace alb?

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    3. Other uses might include a restraint to prevent the posting of derisive comments, a gag to prevent the speaking of them, a noose to make such prevention permanent, and a screen for a confessional in which to seek forgiveness for them.

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    4. Fr Anselm Marie:

      Indeed! The possibilities for strong Irish lace really are endless!

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    5. Fr. Marie,

      I recently discovered the existence of your church and was wanting to know more about it (I live in the Dallas area). Is it Independent, affiliated with an "approved" group, or something else entirely?

      I'm not considering joining (I live on the other side of the metro and am happy at my current church), but I am genuinely interested in learning more about your chapel.

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    6. Those questions are addressed at the website. Other than the Sacraments, there is nothing else offered of any interest.

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    7. I would say this is the relevant page: http://www.oratoryoftheimmaculata.org/about-the-oratory

      The last paragraph is good news and your oratory has my prayers, Fr!

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    8. Lace does burn well too, surprisingly so.

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  6. You must have seen Modestinus' comments on Latinization, I take it?

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    1. I saw what he wrote on my blog a week or two ago, so rather than let it bother me I have decided it is best to have some fun with the idea!

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  7. Update on the Spanish Biretta Question, which has caused mayhem on the Iberian Peninsula (allegedly).

    There is news of a MUST VISIT Liturgical Boutique accessory facility at DOMUS BIRETTARUM, which is available at http://domusbirettarum.blogspot.co.uk/

    It is described as "Bespoke Clerical Millinery for the Discerning Clergyman".

    You heard it here first at The Liturgical Boutique.

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  8. There is excellent coverage of the new Liturgical Boutique facility on another first-class Blog, SUB UMBRA ALARUM SUARUM.

    Why not pop over to read what Matthaeus is saying about The Rad Trad's Liturgical Boutique. You can read all about it at http://sub-umbra-alarum-suarum.blogspot.co.uk/

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  9. Ooooooo! It would seem we are gaining much-deserved fame in the interweb circles of liturgical good taste. Well done my d-d-dear Zephy.

    I wonder if his traddiness has any of that fabulous purple one in stock (the one with the green pom-pom, to be exact). I must say, though, that the camoflauge biretta is particularly droll.

    -Fr. Anthony Blanche, SJ

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  10. Dear Radtrad,

    What is your take on the Anglican Ordinariate? Would it not be lovely to have a vibrant English liturgy? Being that the ordinariate is in her infancy the possibilities are great. The potential of recapturing the English world by treasuring what is great and fixing what went south. For example, utilizing the King James which is de facto the Bible of the English speaking world but making it Catholic. Or breathing new life into the Sarum Use. Blending the book of common prayer with the roman missal. Encouraging the Latin mass or extraordinary form within the ordinariate. Creating stronger cultural ties between the US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and mother Britain. Emphasizing the queen in the liturgy and maybe even the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Archbishop of Westminster. How fun. I know I'm a bit of a dreamer, perhaps some day you will join me, and the world can be as one.

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    1. Well, aren't you enthusiastic? Since modern Rome cannot stand Tradition (even her own) and the majority of Ordinariate clergy don't care for either the Prayer Book or Sarum, I cannot see any of those things happening.

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    2. My only Ordinariate experience was with the then new community in Oxford under Msgr Andrew Burnham, a fine man and priest. Liturgically they were rather Oratorian: Pauline Mass with baroque vestments and choral music. I attended the first Ordinariate-unique liturgy there, votive Vespers of the Holy Spirit, essentially the old Roman Vespers with English choral music. On the whole I was not impressed.

      I am told the American Ordinariate is much more liturgical than the English one, although I cannot testify to this as I have experience with it. I may be moving to San Antonio, which would give me an opportunity to see Fr Phillips' very impressive Ordinariate church and community, which does have its own rite/use.

      My question for the English has always been what *is* "Anglican patrimony?" Choral Evensong or something else? The English Ordinariate seems composed mainly of so-called Anglo-Papists and Anglo-Catholics who were long using the Roman liturgy in their former churches. Now in the Catholic Church it is as though they have made a lateral move (not that this is a bad thing).

      Perhaps a trip to San Antonio will answer my question.

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    3. That should be "...I have NO experience..."

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    4. "The English Ordinariate seems composed mainly of so-called Anglo-Papists and Anglo-Catholics who were long using the Roman liturgy in their former churches. Now in the Catholic Church it is as though they have made a lateral move (not that this is a bad thing)."

      That is exactly what has happened in the vast majority of cases. The only difference is that they have exchanged the society of well-educated, urbane clergy in the Church of England for the likes of John Zuhlsdorf. Isn't anybody else curious as to why the eminent Fr Hunwicke's schedule is so busy nowadays? It's because he is probably the only English clergyman in Traddieland with a brain!

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  11. Is it true that The Liturgical Boutique is about to have an Autumnal Sale on Folded Chasubles ?

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    1. Presumably so everyone can stock up in readiness for all those High Masses during Advent - we can at least dream.

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    2. Folded Chasubles? How pedestrian.

      Now THIS is how you properly satisfy a liturgical fetish:

      http://frtimpike.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/20130512-235736.jpg

      Elaborate embroidery is truly a lost art.

      - Fr. Anthony Blanche, SJ

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    3. Fr. Anthony,
      Have just had a look at the link. The vestments are, indeed, magnificent, however I do feel that celebrating Mass without heads is taking the Feast of the Beheading of John the Baptist a bit too far! :-)

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    4. And we wonder why people don't "get into the spirit" of the feastdays anymore... *sigh*

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  12. I don't know what century Patricius hails from but his view of Anglican clergy is not 21st!

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  14. Does anyone know of a firm or community that makes the classic French clerical tabs [black with white edging, in the style of the Cure' d'Ars]? I have seen one British source, but they are very crudely made and are attached with strings. I am looking for the kind that would fall over the cassock collar and extend some 6" inches as a straight, single piece. Many thanks!!

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  16. Rad Trad,
    I am currently working on a senior thesis in history studying the effects that the reforms of Vatican II had on the lived religion of Catholicism in the Archdiocese of Boston, and how the clergy of that time understood, accepted and implemented the changes Vatican II entailed. I think the Mass will be a major point of focus for my paper. I would love to discuss the state of the liturgical life and the Church, particularly in the 50's and 60's with you, if that might be possible? Thank you and I continue to enjoy your blog!

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    1. Andrew,

      Email me at theradtrad@gmail.com and I'll be in touch.

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